Reflection on Talitha Kumi/Environmental Education Center of the ELCJHL

An excerpt from a sermon preached on Sunday, June 28, 2015 at Saint Luke Lutheran Church in Silver Spring, MD. Gospel: Mark 5:21-38

“One day during our trip to Israel and Palestine, my group visited a Lutheran school for children of all ages in the village of Beit Jala, which is near Bethlehem, in the West Bank. We visited this school to tour the Environmental Education Center of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land (or the ELCJHL). We toured the garden containing both plants and trees that are native to the land, as well as foreign plants and trees that are not. We walked on fun, kid-friendly boardwalks and even got to climb into a kind of treehouse.

We saw the water treatment system, which filters and renews waste-water from the school to water the garden. This water treatment system represents good stewardship of God’s creation. It is also useful because Palestinian communities frequently experience water shortages.

The name of the school is from the Aramaic language, the same Aramaic we hear in the gospel reading for this morning. The name of the school is Talitha Kumi. ‘Little girl, get up.’

The Palestinian children of Talitha Kumi are confined to a limited geographical area due to policies of the Israeli government. They or their family members may have had firsthand exposure to violence due to tensions at military checkpoints and some cities in the West Bank.

At their school, at the Environmental Education Center, the children can, and do, get up.

As they learn about conservation and care for God’s creation at the Environmental Education center, their understanding of the world grows. The children are not powerless victims. They are empowered children of God. The education and care that they receive at school strengthens their minds and their ability to live in a world where they may not always feel welcome. In a world where a tall concrete wall that runs between the olive groves, between Jerusalem and Bethlehem usually prevents them and Israeli children from getting to know one another. The empowerment that they receive through programs such as the Environmental Education center reminds them that a way of more peaceful living is possible.”

Anna Ernst
aernst@lstc.edu

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Better late than never – further reflections from Metro Chicago

Dear followers of the 2015 PNW-Young Adult Holy Land Trips (and fellow pilgrimage-goers),

For those who were at home, we hope you have enjoyed following our pilgrimages this summer. I’ve been back for as long as I was away now, but still have at least five reflections in me that really need to be written, so this is a quick post to hold myself accountable to that. The first is an excerpt from a sermon I preached this past Sunday and will follow this post immediately. Thank you for reading, learning, being, and acting into the future with us.

Anna Ernst
aernst@lstc.edu